Parents

  • Tympanoplasty

    Tympanoplasty What Is a Tympanoplasty? Tympanoplasty (TIM-pah-noh-plass-tee) is a surgery to repair the eardrum. The eardrum is a thin layer of tissue that vibrates in response to sound. Why Is a Tympanoplasty Done? Doctors do a tympanoplasty when the eardrum (or tympanic membrane) has a hole that doesn't close on its own. It is done to improve hearing and prevent water from getting into the middle ear. Kids ...
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  • Craniopharyngioma

    Craniopharyngioma What Is a Craniopharyngioma? A craniopharyngioma is a rare type of benign (not cancerous) brain tumor. These tumors usually form close to the pituitary gland and do not spread to other areas. Doctors usually can remove these tumors with surgery or treat them with high doses of radiation. Most people treated for a craniopharyngioma are cured. What Happens With a Craniopharyngioma? A ...
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  • Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma

    Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma What Is a Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma? A juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma (JNA) is a growth in the area behind the nose. These growths are benign (not cancer), but can damage nerves and bones and block ear and sinus drainage. Almost all JNAs are in teenage boys. What Are the Signs & Symptoms of a Juvenile Nasopharyngeal Angiofibroma? Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas cause ...
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  • Cholesteatoma

    Cholesteatoma What Is a Cholesteatoma? A cholesteatoma (kuh-less-tee-uh-TOE-muh) is a growth behind the eardrum, in the middle part of the ear where tiny bones relay sound waves from the eardrum to the inner ear. As a cholesteatoma grows, it can damage the bones of the middle ear. This can lead to hearing loss if it's not treated. What Are the Signs & Symptoms of a Cholesteatoma? A child with a ...
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  • The Danger of Antibiotic Overuse

    The Danger of Antibiotic Overuse What Is Antibiotic Overuse? Antibiotic overuse is when antibiotics are used when they're not needed. Antibiotics are one of the great advances in medicine. But overprescribing them has led to resistant bacteria (bacteria that are harder to treat). Some germs that were once very responsive to antibiotics have become more and more resistant. This can cause more serious infections, such as ...
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  • Halo-Gravity Traction

    Halo-Gravity Traction What Is Halo-Gravity Traction? Halo-gravity traction is a way to pull the head and spine upward carefully, applying a slow stretch to the spine. Doctors do this by attaching a halo (a metal ring that surrounds the head) to a pulley system. Over several weeks, weights are added to the pulley system to slowly pull the head upward. This pulling is called "traction." Kids stay in the ...
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  • Cleft Palate With Cleft Lip

    Cleft Palate With Cleft Lip What Is Cleft Lip and Palate? A cleft of the lip or palate happens when a baby is born with an opening in the upper lip or the roof of the mouth (the palate). These orofacial clefts are some of the most common birth defects. A baby with a cleft might have: only a cleft palate only a cleft lip both a cleft lip and a cleft palate A cleft palate (PAL-it) is when a baby is born with an opening (a ...
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  • Orofacial Clefts

    Orofacial Clefts What Is a Cleft? A cleft is when a baby is born with an opening in the lip and/or roof of the mouth (palate). A baby with a cleft might have: only a cleft lip both a cleft lip and a cleft palate (PAL-it) only a cleft palate Cleft lip alone and cleft lip with a cleft palate happen more often in boys. A cleft palate without a cleft lip is more common in girls. Together, these are called orofacial ...
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  • Cleft Lip

    Cleft Lip What Is a Cleft Lip? Babies who are born with cleft lip have a gap or opening in the upper lip. This happens when the baby's lip doesn't form properly early in pregnancy, resulting in a split. These orofacial clefts are some of the most common birth defects. Most kids can have surgery to repair them early in life. A baby with a cleft might have: only a cleft lip only a cleft palate both a cleft ...
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  • Cleft Palate

    Cleft Palate What Is a Cleft Palate? A cleft palate (PAL-it) is when a baby is born with an opening (a cleft) in the roof of the mouth. This leaves a hole between the nose and the mouth. The opening can: just be in the back of the palate (the soft palate) or extend into the front of the palate behind the gums (the hard palate) Sometimes the opening in the palate can connect with an opening in the gums and the ...
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